South Bay Clean Power

MALIBU CITY COUNCIL BECOMES NEXT CITY TO GIVE SBCP PLAN A CHANCE

Despite offers from LA County to become the first city to join their County Choice Energy, yet another city has chosen to weigh the County’s business plan against our South Bay Clean Power business plan to evaluate and determine which is best for them.

Here’s how it went in Malibu last night, as SBCP Working Group Chair, Joe Galliani, presented to the Mayor and City Council before asking them to officially receive and file the South Bay Clean Power draft JPA and Business Plan.

Torrance City Council Votes to Review South Bay Clean Power Business Plan

Last night at the Torrance City Council meeting Council voted 6-1 to approve their City Manager’s recommendations that they:

1) Receive and file the South Bay Clean Power (SBCP) Working Group’s draft Joint Powers Authority Agreement, Business Plan, and presentation; and
2) Receive and file the Los Angeles Community Choice Energy Working Group’s final Joint Powers Authority Agreement and presentation; and
3) Direct staff to perform an analysis of the business plans, joint powers authority agreements and potential participation in the Community Choice Aggregation programs and return with recommendations.

Here’s a video clip of the vote:

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Yesterday’s CCA Panel at the Greentech Media California’s Distributed Energy Forum

Greetings from San Francisco where yesterday, South Bay Clean Power’s Acting Chair,  Joe Galliani, spoke on the Community Choice Aggregation panel moderated by GTM’s ace reporter, Julia Pyper, with fellow panelists, Becky Menten, Director of Customer Programs for Marin Clean Energy and Barry Vesser Deputy Director of the Center for Climate Protection.

Demand Generation

City of West Hollywood Votes to Review SBCP Business Plan and Draft JPA

Last night the City of West Hollywood joined Torrance and Santa Monica in asking City Staff to review and report back on our South Bay Clean Power Business Plan and draft Joint Powers Authority agreement.  The City wisely agreed to keep their CCA options open with both the County of Los Angeles effort and our own.  We expect all South Bay Clean Power cities to do likewise in the coming 30 days.

Here’s our West Hollywood CCA champion, Councilmember Lindsey Horvath and her comments last night before the unanimous vote to approve:

Samuel Golding’s Insight Into the South Bay Clean Power Business Plan

2017-02-16_15-48-44As the primary author of the South Bay Clean Power Business Plan, Samuel Golding, of Community Choice Partners, has been consulting for our SBCP Working Group since the summer of 2016.  Here’s Samuel’s guest post on the models employed for the best practices that drive the strategic direction and planning for South Bay Clean Power’s CCA:

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

South Bay Clean Power is BIG. Two times the size of the largest CCA under implementation in Northern California. And when all of Los Angeles County goes CCA, almost one-third of Southern California Edison’s current load will be served by public power:

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One of the most important takeaways from our research, analysis and planning is that with this scale comes the responsibility to design an appropriate kind of CCA. The launch process and routine that has worked for smaller CCAs will not work for South Bay Clean Power. Our Business Plan details the design and process that will work, based on proven models and best practices.

The main issue is that South Bay Clean Power should not rely on a primary power supplier at the outset, as other CCAs have done.  Instead, the program must diversify its sources and suppliers of power — from Day 1. The CCA also need to work with Southern California Edison to make sure that the transition goes smoothly. Both parties share the responsibility to make that happen — proactively and collaboratively – because South Bay Clean Power is so large.

The ability to do all that practically means contracting for a full suite of energy risk management services – and doing so based on the proven model of capabilities that established public power entities employ. Growing these risk management capabilities incrementally over a period of years, like smaller CCAs have done, is not a viable option for South Bay Clean Power — the CCA needs to launch with those capabilities in place. Read More